Southern Oregon Orthopedics
  • Dr. Denard’s Blog

    Expert Advice from a
    Leading Shoulder Surgeon.

Blog

  • Can Repairing Your Rotator Cuff Save You Money?

    Can Repairing Your Rotator Cuff Save You Money?

    With changes in health care physicians are increasingly being scrutinized for the care they administer including rotator cuff repair. More and more we are required to ask ourselves whether a procedure or medicine is cost-effective, that is does it produce a result medically and does it come at a reasonable cost.

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  • Can You Play Baseball after SLAP Repair?

    Can You Play Baseball after SLAP Repair?

    There is a lot of variation in the rate of return to play after SLAP repair. Tears of the superior labrum or superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) are common in overhead athletes and can occur after trauma (falls or traction injuries). In overhead athletes, tears are thought to occur from the “peelback” mechanism where the superior labrum undergoes stress when the arm is placed in the throwing position or maximal abduction and external rotation.

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  • If You Have a Rotator Cuff Tear, Should the Opposite Shoulder Be Screened?

    If You Have a Rotator Cuff Tear, Should the Opposite Shoulder Be Screened?

    An emerging topic in the shoulder world is screening for rotator cuff tears. One question is if the opposite shoulder should also be screened for a rotator cuff tear. That is, if someone has a rotator cuff tear in one shoulder, should the other shoulder be evaluated with an MRI or ultrasound to determine if there is a tear in the opposite shoulder?

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  • Are You Too Old for a Rotator Cuff Repair?

    Are You Too Old for a Rotator Cuff Repair?

    Rotator cuff tears increase with age and are particularly common in people over the age of 65. At the same time the ability to get the rotator cuff to heal after a repair decreases as we age.

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  • What is the Best Treatment of a Type III AC Separation?

    What is the Best Treatment of a Type III AC Separation?

    There are several types of acromioclavicular (AC) separations. Low grade injuries (Type I and II) involve limited injury to the AC joint only and should be managed conservatively. In contrast, high grade injuries (Type IV, V, and VI) involve injury to the AC joint, coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments, and overlying fascia and should thus be managed surgically.

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  • How Long Does a Shoulder Replacement Last?

    How Long Does a Shoulder Replacement Last?

    One of the most common questions for people considering a shoulder replacement is: “How long will it last?” For people with severe shoulder arthritis, a shoulder replacement can provide predictable pain relief and improvement in quality of life and function.

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  • What Are the Complications After Shoulder Arthroscopy?

    What Are the Complications After Shoulder Arthroscopy?

    Shoulder arthroscopy has been a major advancement in the treatment of shoulder conditions. Through the use a camera and small stab incisions, conditions in the shoulder can be clearly viewed and treated in a minimally invasive fashion.

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  • Quality of Life After Reverse Shoulder Replacement

    Quality of Life After Reverse Shoulder Replacement

    Reverse shoulder replacement can have a substantial impact on your shoulder function and quality of life. The procedure was developed in France and then approved for use in the United States in 2004.

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  • Returning to Activity After a Clavicle Fracture

    Returning to Activity After a Clavicle Fracture

    A common question I hear when evaluating a patient with a clavicle fracture is: When can I return to full activity? In recent years, there has been an increasing trend toward plate fixation of displaced mid-shaft clavicle fractures.

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  • How Young is Too Young for a Reverse Shoulder Replacement?

    How Young is Too Young for a Reverse Shoulder Replacement?

    The reverse shoulder replacement originally developed in France and was approved by the FDA in the United States in 2004. Since that time there has been an explosion in the use of reverse shoulder replacement.

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