Southern Oregon Orthopedics
  • Dr. Denard’s Blog

    Expert Advice from a
    Leading Shoulder Surgeon.

Blog

  • Does Atrophy Improve After Rotator Cuff Repair?

    Does Atrophy Improve After Rotator Cuff Repair?

    Atrophy is an important consideration in rotator cuff tears. Atrophy is when a muscle shrinks in size well accepted that greater atrophy leads to a poorer chance of healing following rotator cuff repair. In general, the greater the atrophy, the lower the chance of obtaining healing.

    Read More

  • Return to Sports After Shoulder Dislocation

    Return to Sports After Shoulder Dislocation

    Shoulder dislocation can be a devastating event for athletes and active individuals. When these injuries occur during sports the first question for the athlete is often “When can I return?” The management of shoulder dislocations has evolved over the years. In past years, multiple dislocations were tolerated.

    Read More

  • What Are the Long-Term Outcomes of Arthroscopic Bankart Repair?

    What Are the Long-Term Outcomes of Arthroscopic Bankart Repair?

    For many years open treatment was considered the procedure of choice for surgical stabilization of a patient with shoulder dislocation. With this approach, an incision is made in the front of the shoulder and then the labrum and capsule are repaired to the bone. The downside of this approach is that it is quite invasive (which raises the risk of infection) and it is difficult to address other pathology in the shoulder.

    Read More

  • What is Superior Capsule Reconstruction?

    What is Superior Capsule Reconstruction?

    Superior capsule reconstruction (SCR) is a procedure that is used in the treatment of irreparable rotator cuff tears. The procedure was first described in 2013 by Dr. Teruhisa Mihata from Japan. Patch grafting has a long history of being used to "bridge gaps" in irreparable rotator cuff tears. Mihata’s innovation was attaching the graft to the glenoid or socket site of the joint as opposed to sewing the graft into soft tissue.

    Read More

  • Reverse Shoulder Replacement or Hemiarthroplasty For Proximal Humerus Fracture?

    Reverse Shoulder Replacement or Hemiarthroplasty For Proximal Humerus Fracture?

    The most common fracture or broken bone in the shoulder is the proximal humerus, which is the upper arm bone or ball of the shoulder. The majority of proximal humerus fractures can be treated without an operation. However, in cases of substantial separation or displacement, surgical treatment may be beneficial.

    Read More

  • Can Shoulder Replacement Help Your Golf Game?

    Can Shoulder Replacement Help Your Golf Game?

    Shoulder arthritis may not only be painful, but may more debilitating than you realize. If you are a golfer, you may have noticed how arthritis pain has affected your golf game. Shoulder replacement can alleviate the pain, but can it actually improve your game?

    Read More

  • How Is My Pain Managed After a Total Shoulder Replacement?

    How Is My Pain Managed After a Total Shoulder Replacement?

    Like any surgery, post-operative pain control is a component of total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). This has become increasingly important in with the move toward outpatient TSA.

    Read More

  • Can Repairing Your Rotator Cuff Save You Money?

    Can Repairing Your Rotator Cuff Save You Money?

    With changes in health care physicians are increasingly being scrutinized for the care they administer including rotator cuff repair. More and more we are required to ask ourselves whether a procedure or medicine is cost-effective, that is does it produce a result medically and does it come at a reasonable cost.

    Read More

  • Can You Play Baseball after SLAP Repair?

    Can You Play Baseball after SLAP Repair?

    There is a lot of variation in the rate of return to play after SLAP repair. Tears of the superior labrum or superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) are common in overhead athletes and can occur after trauma (falls or traction injuries). In overhead athletes, tears are thought to occur from the “peelback” mechanism where the superior labrum undergoes stress when the arm is placed in the throwing position or maximal abduction and external rotation.

    Read More

  • If You Have a Rotator Cuff Tear, Should the Opposite Shoulder Be Screened?

    If You Have a Rotator Cuff Tear, Should the Opposite Shoulder Be Screened?

    An emerging topic in the shoulder world is screening for rotator cuff tears. One question is if the opposite shoulder should also be screened for a rotator cuff tear. That is, if someone has a rotator cuff tear in one shoulder, should the other shoulder be evaluated with an MRI or ultrasound to determine if there is a tear in the opposite shoulder?

    Read More

Pages [1] 2 3 of 3 | Next | Last